Joyce Tabone

PR & Marketing, Bank of Valletta

Joyce Tabone is passionate about communication. Be it through words or pictures, her key objective is that the message gets across from one point to the other. As the financial services world becomes increasingly complex, communication becomes all the more important, and Joyce is at her happiest when she’s helping to bridge the gap between the Bank and the market, using digital platforms to act as a bridge rather than a divide. Joyce works within the PR & Marketing team at Bank of Valletta.


To invest or not to invest: Part 2

Friday 10th February 2017

Following the questions in Part 1, here are a few more questions you should ask yourself when thinking of investing.

What are my goals and timeline for investing?

Your investment time frame should provide clear guidance for deciding which investments to choose. Generally, investors have different goals at different stages during their life. The old saying ‘time is money’ sums up precisely why it is important to invest in the long term. Retrospectively, it is evident that investing with a long-term perspective pays off.

What level of risk am I comfortable with?

When developing your investment plan, you should identify and understand the potential risks. As a rule of thumb, if you are afraid of losing your capital, you should think twice before investing in risky assets.

There is a very basic investment principle that you should take note of – the higher the risk potentially leads to higher returns, whilst the lower the risk potentially results in lower returns. Spreading your funds across a spectrum of investments is one of the best ways to mitigate risk and protect against sudden falls in any particular market, sector, or individual investment. With a diversified portfolio of investments, returns from better performing investments can help offset those that under perform.

What are the different methods available for investing, and what are the related costs?

You should consider investing directly if you prefer to manage your own portfolio. Costs may vary depending on how you invest. Investing in collective investment schemes may incur additional costs, such as initial charges, exit fees, and annual management fees. You should also consider the broker’s fees whenever you invest directly in securities, such as equities or bonds.

Alternatively, a financial advisor can help you to build a portfolio that has a fit within your risk profile and return requirements. If you receive investment advice, you may also bear the cost of that advice or service.

As Warren Buffet said, “Investing is laying out money now to get more money back in the future.” You should think of investing as a marathon rather than a sprint, whilst looking to grow your wealth over time and not overnight.


Daniel Bugeja

Business Doctor


10 steps to successful business growth

November 2017

The following 10-step framework has been devised to help small and medium businesses and their leaders towards developing a successful strategy to achieve breakthrough growth.

Frank V. Farrugia

President of the Malta Chamber of Commerce, Enterprise and Industry.


Constitutional Reform, Now

November 2017

True and free journalism is indispensable in any modern democracy as it safeguards morality and ethics across all society.

Louis Olivieri

Marketing Specialist


How To Make Sponsorships Beneficial To Your Organisation

November 2017

Sponsorships can in be effectively used by organisations, whether profit or non-profit making, to achieve their objectives and communicate them.

Frank V. Farrugia

President of the Malta Chamber of Commerce, Enterprise and Industry.


Malta's Future Out Of The Box

October 2017

On 25th October I had the privilege of addressing a national event of great proportion – EY’s Annual Attractiveness Event which drew a crowd of around 800 people.

Etienne Borg Cardona

Founding partner, Capital Advisory Limited


Competing For Talent In The Big League: Adopting A Legitimate Distinctiveness Approach

October 2017

In recent years, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have emerged from the periphery in government policy, and institutional as well as academic research, not least because of their acknowledged contribution to modern economies as employers.

Louis Olivieri

Marketing Specialist


Why Marketing is a People Business – A Personal Point of View

September 2017

"I am a believer that marketing is a people business."