Malta Four Points Away From Hitting Its 2020 Energy Targets

25th January 2018

Back in 2004, just 0.1 per cent of energy in Malta came from renewable sources.

In 2016, Malta was four points away from hitting its 2020 renewable energy targets, according to new figures published by Eurostat.

Malta’s share of energy from renewable sources in 2016 was six per cent – one of the lowest figures in the EU, but not remarkable, given its size.

It’s worth noting the improvement that has been made since 2004, the year Malta joined the European Union – back then, just 0.1 per cent of energy in Malta came from renewable sources.

In 2016, the share of energy from renewable sources in gross final consumption of energy reached 17 per cent in the European Union (EU), double the share in 2004 (8.5 per cent), the first year for which the data are available.

The share of renewables in gross final consumption of energy is one of the headline indicators of the Europe 2020 strategy. The EU's target is to obtain 20 per cent of energy in gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources by 2020 and at least 27 per cent by 2030.

Each EU Member State has its own Europe 2020 target. The national targets take into account the member states’ different starting points, renewable energy potential and economic performance.

Among the 28 EU Member States, 11 have already reached the level required to meet their national 2020 targets: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Croatia, Italy, Lithuania, Hungary, Romania, Finland and Sweden. Moreover, Austria is less than 1 percentage point (pp) away from its 2020 target.

At the opposite end of the scale, the Netherlands (8.0 pp from its national 2020 objective), France (7.0 pp), Ireland (6.5 pp), the United Kingdom (5.7 pp) and Luxembourg (5.6 pp) are the furthest away from their targets.


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