Could The Next President Of The United States Be Half-Maltese?

22nd January 2019

Pete Buttigieg, whose father is Professor Emeritus Joseph A. Buttigieg, is “currently making all the moves one would expect from an about-to-declare 2020 candidate.”

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is being touted as a Democratic presidential candidate – albeit a long-shot one – for the 2020 elections in the United States.

According to a recent, glowing profile in the Washington Post, Mr Buttigieg, whose father is Professor Emeritus Joseph A. Buttigieg, is “currently making all the moves one would expect from an about-to-declare 2020 candidate.”

Mr Buttigieg, a Harvard graduate, has an impressive CV, which includes a summer internship for Ted Kennedy when he was 18, working for John Kerry’s presidential campaign, a Rhodes Scholarship, and becoming the youngest mayor of a midsize US city.

As mayor of South Bend, he “transformed that city into a national model of renewal.” At the same time that he was mayor, he volunteered for active duty in Afghanistan.

Mr Buttigieg, who describes himself as a ‘progressive Democrat’, is openly gay, but stated in the interview that he didn’t care about being identified as ‘the “first gay” anything.’

“The reality is that people care about issues that aren’t ‘their’ issues,” he told the Washington Post. “Elderly residents care about education. Suburban women care about racial justice. Young people care about social programs for the elderly.”

Mr Buttigieg counts among his fans former President Barack Obama, who named him in an interview with the New Yorker in 2017 as one of four Democrats who would lead the party forward.


23rd January 2019

Founder Sir James Dyson has been in favour of Brexit, but chief executive Jim Rowan denied that the move had anything to do with Brexit or tax.

21st January 2019

The mobile app is renewing its efforts to tackle the spread of false information on the platform.

16th January 2019

The OECD also revealed that in EU countries where locals have greater interaction with immigrants, they more readily regard immigrants as an opportunity for their country, rather than a problem.

16th January 2019

More than 337 million EU citizens in 19 countries use the euro on a daily basis.