Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Pilots Followed Procedures, But Could Not Stop Nosedive

4th April 2019

The pilots on duty ‘repeatedly’ followed procedures recommended by Boeing before the crash, but ‘were not able to control the aircraft’, Ethiopia’s Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said.

A preliminary report into the fatal crash of an Ethiopian Airlines plane on 10th March says the aircraft nosedived several times before it crashed.

The pilots on duty ‘repeatedly’ followed procedures recommended by Boeing before the crash, but ‘were not able to control the aircraft’, Ethiopia’s Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said.

The preliminary report from Ethiopian authorities suggested that Boeing review the aircraft control system and said aviation authorities should confirm the problem had been solved before allowing the 737 Max back into the air

Flight ET302 crashed after take-off from Addis Ababa, killing 157 people. The horrific incident took place just five months after Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed into the sea near Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board.

The aircraft involved in both disasters were Boeing 737 Max. Consequently, more than 300 737 Max aeroplanes have been grounded by airlines all over the world, including in all the countries in Europe.

On 12th March, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency announced in March that it was suspending “all flight operations of all Boeing Model 737-8 MAX and 737-9 MAX aeroplanes in Europe.”

According to Refinitiv data quoted by Reuters, the Ethiopian Airlines crash has wiped nearly $25 billion (€22 billion) off Boeing’s market capitalisation.


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