Maltese Adult Children Last In Europe To Leave Parents' Home

15th May 2018

Young adults in Malta and Croatia remained the longest in the parental household, leaving home at an average age of 32.2 and 31.9 respectively, a Eurostat survey found.

Maltese adults are likely to leave it until their 30s before leaving their parents’ home, according to a Europe-wide survey.

Young adults in Malta and Croatia remained the longest in the parental household, leaving home at an average age of 32.2 and 31.9 respectively, a Eurostat survey found.

Young adults in Slovakia (30.8 years), Italy (30.1 years), Greece (29.4 years), Spain (29.3 years), Portugal (29.2 years) and Bulgaria (28.9 years) also left the parental home at a later stage.

Young people leave home earliest in Sweden (21 years), Denmark (21.1 years) and Finland (21.9 years) – as well as in Luxembourg (21.4 years).

They were followed by those in Estonia (23.1 years), Belgium (23.4 years), the Netherlands (23.6 years), Germany (23.7), France (24.0 years) and the United Kingdom (24.4 years).

In the European Union (EU), over one young adult out of four (28.5 per cent) aged 25 to 34 were still living with their parents in 2016. Overall, it is estimated that young people leave the parental household at the age of 26 years on average in the EU.  It should also be noted that in every EU Member State, young women tended to leave the parental household earlier than men.


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